You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon | Mini Review

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Rating: ★★★☆☆

Release Date: January 2nd, 2018

Trigger Warnings: depression

Pages: 384

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Goodreads blurb:

 Eighteen-year-old twins Adina and Tovah have little in common besides their ambitious nature. Viola prodigy Adina yearns to become a soloist—and to convince her music teacher he wants her the way she wants him. Overachiever Tovah awaits her acceptance to Johns Hopkins, the first step on her path toward med school and a career as a surgeon.

But one thing could wreck their carefully planned futures: a genetic test for Huntington’s, a rare degenerative disease that slowly steals control of the body and mind. It’s turned their Israeli mother into a near stranger and fractured the sisters’ own bond in ways they’ll never admit. While Tovah finds comfort in their Jewish religion, Adina rebels against its rules.

When the results come in, one twin tests negative for Huntington’s. The other tests positive.

These opposite outcomes push them farther apart as they wrestle with guilt, betrayal, and the unexpected thrill of first love. How can they repair their relationship, and is it even worth saving?

From debut author Rachel Lynn Solomon comes a luminous, heartbreaking tale of life, death, and the fragile bond between sisters. 


M I N I    R E V I E W

You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone wasn’t a bad book at all, it just wasn’t the book for me. This book should receive every bit of praise it is receiving. It deserves it. Rachel Lynn Solomon writes a stunning debut novel that tackles many hard-hitting topics, like the fact sisters aren’t always close and the bond shared can easily be broken. As well as learning you have a gene that will slowly take away your ability for life.

My problems with You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone simply stem from the fact its a highly character driven novel. Adina and Tovah are fraternal twin sisters and this book follows their journey of one learning that they will develop Huntington’s disease, like their mother. The twins can’t be any more different and their lack of sister like relationship highlights this as we read this book which separates the two perspectives. Tovah has plans to become a surgeon and follows her Judaism belief strongly, whereas Adina wants to practice music and doesn’t as she rebels against all the rules.

I will say it was definitely interesting to get an insight on Judaism. I don’t know a lot about it as a religion and I didn’t realise it was so heavily practised in day to day life. Highly ignorant of me and I’m glad that this book was able to open my eyes on the topic.

I wish I could say more on the characters and what I thought of the plot of the book, but I simply struggled to get into the story and it impacted my entire view, unfortunately. I don’t want to this to keep anyone away from this book, which is why I’m writing this review. I definitely highly recommend this despite my thoughts!


Happy reading everyone!

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4 thoughts on “You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon | Mini Review

  1. Gosh this is so different to what i thought it was going to be about!! I have still got it on my to buy list but it is not a priority!!! This seems like the type of book you have to be in the mood for and after last year being in a bad reading slump i choosing my books more carefully this year!! Thank you darling as usual you always give good honest review

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s definitely true! It’s an interesting read and one that requires a lot of attention, I believe. Such a beautiful story too. Thank you always for your support, means truly the world ❤️

      Like

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